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and millions of their citizens want to build futures in the united states. there's no argument from me there on american exceptionalism, but you argue it's not our ideals that make us exceptional. what do you mean by that? >> i do think so some extent it's our ideals. arabs express tremendous admiration for our ideals and principles and institution of our government. they're outraged by the gap that they perceive between the pay in which we live here in the united states and our conduct in their part of the world. all that being said, we're left with the situation in the middle east right now where no other country has the capacity to do the kinds of things that the united states can do. no other country has the capacity to help the arab world in the ways that the united states can help the arab world, and that's why you still see people like president mohamed morsi, the first civilian elected islamic president of egypt. the muslim brotherhood has a long history of being opposed to the u.s. relations but seeking debt relief and help from the imf. other countries look to the united stat
american influence, and the reality is that the united states has declining influence in the region. that's in many ways natural in part because these are blossoming democracies that want to claim their own political future. but it's -- the anti-americanism is in part because they don't understand why the united states can't prevent the kind of film that was released. they don't fully understand what freedom of the press means, and that we have limited recourse. so this is a problem. this may not be the last incident. there are tensions -- in the same way, you know, muslims don't understand why we can't do anything, americans assume bh there's a protest like this, this means that all muslims are against the united states. i don't think that's true. they value our freedoms and the kind of lifestyle we lead, even if they don't want to be influenced heavily by the united states. >> you talk about the declining influence of the united states. at the beginning of his term president obama made a big show of reaching out to the muslim world with his speech in cairo in 2009. can you assess the ev
cannot afford a break between the united states and egypt when it comes too maintaining that peace treat treaty. >> jacques on the point about the government and egypt being responsive to the mood of the street, we're talking about how sort of reluctant morsi has been to issue a really sort of clear denuns yags of what happened and how to sort of discourage the protests. i want to put this picture on the screen. this is in libya. there was a young man who held up a sign after the attacks that said, sorry, people of america, this is not the behavior of our islam and prophet. there's an attitude on the street in libya. on you prevalent is that attitude in the muslim world and why you don't hear more it? >> it's prevalent but there's complete chaos and confusion there. we had the director of intelligence who referred to the muslim brotherhood in egypt as largely secular. we use these distinctions, and i quite honest don't think we as americans have a very, very accurate understanding of what these parties think about when they think the united states. it's becoming very, very clear that the
with the united states and the iran situatn because you have is clyca all say id he prefers mitt romney to be president and actions and words probably designed to help romney. on the other hand, you have barack the defense minister trying to help obama with the public words and statements. >> i think brack -- >> how will that dice ct b the november election result here? >> i don't think it will be very -- i mean, it might affect the jewish pulation vote more or less but i don't think ehud barack, the defense minister endorsed -- >> when you have netanyahu going out of the way to talk about -- present the image of strained relations and then choosg to go plic and say israel's never usanarobtter friend ithe whi th s -- >> when you are prime minister, you have the upper hand. you're the voice of the country. you are the most important man. you know, when jimmy carter used to say, isrl has no morn policy and only domestic policy. this time in htorye s sody interfering and clearly endorsing one of the sides and it's never happened in the history. and it's doing it in a very delicate moment f
information in may that there was a cell in the united states that was planning to strike. they were getting information that it was going to be a big operation. there were going to be mass casualties. one of the big problems you had, though, was getting past the level of disbelief. you have to remember that the bush administration came in. the republicans had been out of the white house. during that time national security went from countries to being about guys on the tops of mountains in afghanistan. they just didn't buy it. so when you had the cia coming in and saying al qaeda, the pentagon pushed back and said, no, no. it's a fake. bin laden isn't a real threat. he's just trying to gin stuff up so we don't pay attention to iraq. >> kurt, speaking of iraq, one of the things that i'm still trying to figure out is how exactly and why exactly we ended up going to war with iraq. can you take us behind the scenes in that decision-making process? >> the decision-making process was really ugly. there are a few things that come out in "500 days." one is that the defense intelligence agency did an
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)